Why Mothers Make Great Employees

In May, we take time to appreciate mothers and motherhood.   However, we tend to relegate motherhood to a place outside the workplace. In fact, mothers take great effort to prove that motherhood will not interfere with what is considered traditional work life. (After all, there is no harder job than being a mother!) Today we’re going to turn that notion upside down and share four of the reasons why mothers make great employees.

Mother’s Intuition

Intuition is when our brain recalls past experiences and interprets external cues to make a split-second decision. There have been hundreds of real-life stories of mothers who make a choice based on intuition that averted a family tragedy.  Perhaps you’ve felt butterflies in your stomach or had a strong impulse to make a particular choice.  Although mysterious, a mother’s enhanced ability to interpret a situation is a valuable asset to any work team.

Master Multi-Tasker

The ultimate stereotype of a mother is the woman juggling multiple activities simultaneously.  How else would everything get done?  Nimble multi-tasking is a must.   When you are up against an impossible deadline and have many fires to put out, who do you want on your team?  A master multi-tasker, that’s who!

Nerves of Steel

An interviewer asked one of my clients if she had the “nerves to handle really tough and insulting customers.”  She promptly replied that not only has she worked in a competitive sales office environment, but she has a teenager at home.  Yes, mothers have nerves of steel.  Try taking away video games from a 12-year old or telling a teenage daughter “no” to a pair of new shoes takes resolve. If a mother can survive what kids say in a heated moment, they certainly can diplomatically interact with the toughest of customers. 

Able to Make Tough Decisions

Mothers are also known for making tough, often unpopular, choices.  It’s no fun being the one to enforce bedtime rules, healthy eating, and homework.  Additionally, there are the challenges of making budgetary decisions for the long-term benefit of the family rather than the short-term fun of a week at the beach.  It seems that motherhood is a succession of tough choices.   When you need a shrewd, big-picture thinker  who is brave enough to go against the tide to do what is right, consider a mother’s experience in this area.

Those of just four examples of how a mother would be a great employee.   Each of us comes to the table with unique experiences through which we can build valuable workplace skills.  In addition to work experience and education, experience as a mother is no doubt a valuable asset!  

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Why Mothers Make Great Employees

In May, we take time to appreciate mothers and motherhood.   However, we tend to relegate motherhood to a place outside the workplace. In fact, mothers take great effort to prove that motherhood will not interfere with what is considered traditional work life. (After all, there is no harder job than being a mother!) Today we’re going to turn that notion upside down and share four of the reasons why mothers make great employees.

Mother’s Intuition

Intuition is when our brain recalls past experiences and interprets external cues to make a split-second decision. There have been hundreds of real-life stories of mothers who make a choice based on intuition that averted a family tragedy.  Perhaps you’ve felt butterflies in your stomach or had a strong impulse to make a particular choice.  Although mysterious, a mother’s enhanced ability to interpret a situation is a valuable asset to any work team.

Master Multi-Tasker

The ultimate stereotype of a mother is the woman juggling multiple activities simultaneously.  How else would everything get done?  Nimble multi-tasking is a must.   When you are up against an impossible deadline and have many fires to put out, who do you want on your team?  A master multi-tasker, that’s who!

Nerves of Steel

An interviewer asked one of my clients if she had the “nerves to handle really tough and insulting customers.”  She promptly replied that not only has she worked in a competitive sales office environment, but she has a teenager at home.  Yes, mothers have nerves of steel.  Try taking away video games from a 12-year old or telling a teenage daughter “no” to a pair of new shoes takes resolve. If a mother can survive what kids say in a heated moment, they certainly can diplomatically interact with the toughest of customers. 

Able to Make Tough Decisions

Mothers are also known for making tough, often unpopular, choices.  It’s no fun being the one to enforce bedtime rules, healthy eating, and homework.  Additionally, there are the challenges of making budgetary decisions for the long-term benefit of the family rather than the short-term fun of a week at the beach.  It seems that motherhood is a succession of tough choices.   When you need a shrewd, big-picture thinker  who is brave enough to go against the tide to do what is right, consider a mother’s experience in this area.

Those of just four examples of how a mother would be a great employee.   Each of us comes to the table with unique experiences through which we can build valuable workplace skills.  In addition to work experience and education, experience as a mother is no doubt a valuable asset!  

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