What’s Your Big Idea?

“In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker  unless you can also sell what you create.”  –David Ogilvy.Ogilvy’s groundbreaking work on how to convey messages to huge audiences still resonates sixty years after he began turning his clients into household names.His central principle for successful advertising is what he called the “Big Idea.” It applies to presentations as well:1. Go through your data and ideas for a subject. Then, whittle everything down to an idea that can be expressed in less  than 10 words.2. Mold your message around those 10 words.3. When your audience hears your presentation, what do you want them to remember above all else? Stop thinking that you are giving a presentation about a topic. You are there to achieve an objective.That’s the Big Idea.It creates  the core of your presentation and keeps you focused on the punch line, not the supporting data.Really effective presentations focus only on what your audience needs to see and hear in order to be influenced. What’s your Big Idea?
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Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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What’s Your Big Idea?

“In the modern world of business, it is useless to be a creative, original thinker unless you can also sell what you create.”  —David Ogilvy.

Ogilvy’s groundbreaking work on how to convey messages to huge audiences still resonates sixty years after he began turning his clients into household names.

OgilvyHis central principle for successful advertising is what he called the “Big Idea.” It applies to presentations as well:

1. Go through your data and ideas for a subject. Then, whittle everything down to an idea that can be expressed in less  than 10 words.

2. Mold your message around those 10 words.

3. When your audience hears your presentation, what do you want them to remember above all else? Stop thinking that you are giving a presentation about a topic. You are there to achieve an objective.

That’s the Big Idea.

It creates  the core of your presentation and keeps you focused on the punch line, not the supporting data.

Really effective presentations focus only on what your audience needs to see and hear in order to be influenced. 

What’s your Big Idea?

 


Link to original post

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Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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