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What If Merges Melded Minds?

Have you noticed  more and more companies unite lately to the demise of one side?  No wonder workers want more from merges.

Unfortunately though, not all amalgamations survive the  stifling challenges that follow new partnerships. Merges make people and profits hit the dust when they fail to harness capital from either side.

What If Mergers …

1). What if merges cultivated curiosity about the other side?

People often fear  mergers and for good reason. Workers fear losing cooperation they’ve cultivated. Leaders fear compromise  and gridlocks that robs progress. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Successful unions cultivate curiosity for shared value. Wins follow for all when differences triumph. High-performing unions start with lessons learned oposing views.

2).What if merges used mutual mentoring?

One young leader contacted the MITA Center for advice on a failed merger a few weeks back. This man tried to transport an enviable culture from a top food chain, into a new city setting with unfamiliar staff. It didn’t work.

Through mindguides – or mutual mentors –  mergers follow when leaders miss key differences among people – unique traits that people possess which could add high dividends to any combined effort.

When leaders ignore cultural differences they do so at their own peril, as this man did. Still others miss mining diverse intellectual proclivities that could lead to peak performances from many sides of mergers.

3).What if merges facilitated mental makeovers for both sides?

Below are brainpowered questions to the 5-way Mita test for genius results:

a. How could cultural differences create an improved  vision?
b. What will all departments help to design visible benefits?
c. What exact dividends do people expect from united cultures?
d. What intelligences will inspire novelty and creativity?
e. How will both sides add and receive sustainable value to the merger?

Address these five issues with an action plan for each and watch your merger profit in response.

How do you combine differences into successful mergers? You’ll know that opposing sides merge together well,  when most workers speak and feel heard at work.

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Have you noticed  more and more companies unite lately to the demise of one side?  No wonder workers want more from merges.

Unfortunately though, not all amalgamations survive the  stifling challenges that follow new partnerships. Merges make people and profits hit the dust when they fail to harness capital from either side.

What If Mergers …

1). What if merges cultivated curiosity about the other side?

People often fear  mergers and for good reason. Workers fear losing cooperation they’ve cultivated. Leaders fear compromise  and gridlocks that robs progress. It doesn’t have to be that way.

Successful unions cultivate curiosity for shared value. Wins follow for all when differences triumph. High-performing unions start with lessons learned oposing views.

2).What if merges used mutual mentoring?

One young leader contacted the MITA Center for advice on a failed merger a few weeks back. This man tried to transport an enviable culture from a top food chain, into a new city setting with unfamiliar staff. It didn’t work.

Through mindguides – or mutual mentors –  mergers follow when leaders miss key differences among people – unique traits that people possess which could add high dividends to any combined effort.

When leaders ignore cultural differences they do so at their own peril, as this man did. Still others miss mining diverse intellectual proclivities that could lead to peak performances from many sides of mergers.

3).What if merges facilitated mental makeovers for both sides?

Below are brainpowered questions to the 5-way Mita test for genius results:

a. How could cultural differences create an improved  vision?
b. What will all departments help to design visible benefits?
c. What exact dividends do people expect from united cultures?
d. What intelligences will inspire novelty and creativity?
e. How will both sides add and receive sustainable value to the merger?

Address these five issues with an action plan for each and watch your merger profit in response.

How do you combine differences into successful mergers? You’ll know that opposing sides merge together well,  when most workers speak and feel heard at work.

Link to original post

0 Comments

Leave a reply

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