Van Gogh, Rakim, and what HR pros should be focused on


There’s a lot of discussions going on about the state of HR. Some are outside opinions but most are generated from HR professionals questioning the future of what we do. It’s enough to think that we have an inferiority complex. I think a little self reflection is a good thing so I encourage you to check out the interweb and join in the discussion.

My opinion will be brief-HR should be about art, not business.

Artists create bodies of work with little or no obvious monetary value. They often work against unpopular opinions of who they are or what they do. Their relationship with their business partners (e.g., patrons, art institutions, government agencies) and the public are often less than ideal, if not downright antagonistic. Most die under-appreciated and it’s only afterward that they may become recognized for their contributions.

Sound familiar?

So my challenge to you is this-make your work an artistic endeavor. Let other people’s perception take a backseat to your certainty that you’re creating something of value (monetary and otherwise). Time and perspective will be the best judge.

And to get you further motivated here’s a personal favorite of mine when I need to stay motivated (hat tip to Crystal Peterson and Kris Dunn for the inspiration):

Link to original post

Avatar

Uncategorized

Leave a Reply

Van Gogh, Rakim, and what HR pros should be focused on


There’s a lot of discussions going on about the state of HR. Some are outside opinions but most are generated from HR professionals questioning the future of what we do. It’s enough to think that we have an inferiority complex. I think a little self reflection is a good thing so I encourage you to check out the interweb and join in the discussion.

My opinion will be brief-HR should be about art, not business.

Artists create bodies of work with little or no obvious monetary value. They often work against unpopular opinions of who they are or what they do. Their relationship with their business partners (e.g., patrons, art institutions, government agencies) and the public are often less than ideal, if not downright antagonistic. Most die under-appreciated and it’s only afterward that they may become recognized for their contributions.

Sound familiar?

So my challenge to you is this-make your work an artistic endeavor. Let other people’s perception take a backseat to your certainty that you’re creating something of value (monetary and otherwise). Time and perspective will be the best judge.

And to get you further motivated here’s a personal favorite of mine when I need to stay motivated (hat tip to Crystal Peterson and Kris Dunn for the inspiration):

Link to original post

Avatar

Uncategorized

Leave a Reply