Check out the new book by one of our favorite authors Peter Psichogios

Leading from the Front Line: Learn How to Create Exceptional Customer Experiences.

Click here to learn more about Peter's new book!

The Dark Side of Leadership

With today’s
political darkness, many have compared the government shutdown to the conflict
between Clinton and Gingrich. What was missing with both Gingrich and today’s
Tea Party is what Jeb Bush calls a “little dose of reality.” Before we look at
Jeb Bush’s remarks, it’s wise to recognize that this dark side of leadership
has a long history in fact and in literature. One of the greatest speeches in
Western history, Hamlet’s soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 4, emphasizes the foibles
of leadership with an utter lack of a sense of reality. Although Bush comments
from a political perspective, Hamlet applies just as well to business
leadership. This is a highly relevant case of what literature can do for the politician and the businessperson.
Fortinbras, the Crown Prince of Norway is marching
against Poland, but not the “main of Poland.” Hamlet learns from Fortinbras’
captain that they go only “to gain a little patch of ground/That hath in it no
profit but the name.” The Norwegian Captain bitterly remarks that it isn’t
worth five ducats, and Hamlet guesses that the battle will cost twenty thousand
ducats and two thousand men. In short, the battle is absolutely meaningless.Then Hamlet thinks to himself, “Even two thousand men and
twenty-thousand ducats are just the beginning of what it will cost to settle
this pointless matter. This is what happens when countries have too much money
and peace. This quarrel is like an abscess that grows inside someone until it
bursts and kills them, and no one knows why. . . . What is a human being if he
just eats and sleeps? Nothing more than a beast. God didn’t create us with such
a huge power of thought and a divine capacity for reason in order for us not to
use them. . . . So where does that leave me? To my shame, I watch twenty
thousand men go marching to their deaths for an illusion and a little bit of
fame, fighting for a tiny piece of land not even big enough to bury them all.”Jeb Bush, not at all intimidated by the Right, adds that
he wants to offer “a little dose of reality.” With Republicans holding the
majority in the House, they only control “one-half of one-third” of the federal
government, meaning their influence is greatly limited. “It’s a reality. This
isn’t a hypothetical. So as we get close to these deadlines, there needs to be
an understanding that politically it’s quite dicey for the Republican party.”
He continues to argue against the Affordable Care Act.Then Bush summarizes, “But I do think the emphasis of
being against the president’s policies, no matter how principled they are,
needs to be only half the story, if not less. There ought to be more focus on
the efforts underway in state capitals and outside of government, to be honest
with you, to rebuild America in a more traditional way.”My take is that Bush has accurately portrayed the issue. But
Hamlet has laid out the issues far, far better. And that was early seventeenth
century (1602—1623).Flickr photo: by bocadeescena.com
Link to original post

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Hamlet
With today’s political darkness, many have compared the government shutdown to the conflict between Clinton and Gingrich. What was missing with both Gingrich and today’s Tea Party is what Jeb Bush calls a “little dose of reality.” Before we look at Jeb Bush’s remarks, it’s wise to recognize that this dark side of leadership has a long history in fact and in literature. One of the greatest speeches in Western history, Hamlet’s soliloquy in Act 4, Scene 4, emphasizes the foibles of leadership with an utter lack of a sense of reality. Although Bush comments from a political perspective, Hamlet applies just as well to business leadership. This is a highly relevant case of what literature can do for the politician and the businessperson.

 

Fortinbras, the Crown Prince of Norway is marching against Poland, but not the “main of Poland.” Hamlet learns from Fortinbras’ captain that they go only “to gain a little patch of ground/That hath in it no profit but the name.” The Norwegian Captain bitterly remarks that it isn’t worth five ducats, and Hamlet guesses that the battle will cost twenty thousand ducats and two thousand men. In short, the battle is absolutely meaningless.

Then Hamlet thinks to himself, “Even two thousand men and twenty-thousand ducats are just the beginning of what it will cost to settle this pointless matter. This is what happens when countries have too much money and peace. This quarrel is like an abscess that grows inside someone until it bursts and kills them, and no one knows why. . . . What is a human being if he just eats and sleeps? Nothing more than a beast. God didn’t create us with such a huge power of thought and a divine capacity for reason in order for us not to use them. . . . So where does that leave me? To my shame, I watch twenty thousand men go marching to their deaths for an illusion and a little bit of fame, fighting for a tiny piece of land not even big enough to bury them all.”

Jeb Bush, not at all intimidated by the Right, adds that he wants to offer “a little dose of reality.” With Republicans holding the majority in the House, they only control “one-half of one-third” of the federal government, meaning their influence is greatly limited. “It’s a reality. This isn’t a hypothetical. So as we get close to these deadlines, there needs to be an understanding that politically it’s quite dicey for the Republican party.” He continues to argue against the Affordable Care Act.

Then Bush summarizes, “But I do think the emphasis of being against the president’s policies, no matter how principled they are, needs to be only half the story, if not less. There ought to be more focus on the efforts underway in state capitals and outside of government, to be honest with you, to rebuild America in a more traditional way.”

My take is that Bush has accurately portrayed the issue. But Hamlet has laid out the issues far, far better. And that was early seventeenth century (1602—1623).

Flickr photo: by bocadeescena.com

0 Comments

Leave a reply

©2016 Human Capital League Your business online - made simple!

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?