Talent For The Long Run

If You Are
In Business For the Long run. . .
. . .then you need the kind of people who will:

1. Take you there2. Keep you thereDo you know who those “kinds” of people are?I’m in the midst of working with a company who wants to genuinely
hire and develop talent for the future. So I put together an activity
(doesn’t take long with the right cross-section of people) to pinpoint
the talents needed by everyone in order to take this company where it
wants to go.Below is a graphic that shows the results of the session. These are
now being used as an over-arching set of characteristics by which to
hire and identify current talent.I’ll explain a little more following the graphic. One important note:
When we talk about “ability” in the examples, we are talking about an
observable, consistent tendency to demonstrate the related
behavior in a variety of situations. We are focused on people who will
demonstrate these talents regardless of role, job description or
business unit.Have a look:The Benefits1. A key group of people has to dig deep–mentally and
emotionally–to agree on these fundamental talents. 2. We are talking about a systemic issue here. Instead of talking
philosophically about building a culture, a critical mass of people with
these talents will create and sustain it.3.These are tied directly to the long-term strategy.4. We can assess/identify who exhibits or possesses these, even if
they haven’t yet had the opportunity to display them in hugely
noticeable ways. That is, the organization is committed to uncovering
what may not have been obvious in the way it operated in the past. They
are not willing to toss people by the wayside without a real good look
at what they are all about.What Will Be Tough1. Have you thought about the biases that people build toward others
after a period of time working together? (The expression “Familiarity
breeds contempt” comes to mind). So we’re setting up a methodology that
won’t allow any one ticked-off manager or colleague to have enough
singular power to zap someone because of some historical, one-time
incident.2. It’s not clear that some of the HR staff have many of these
characteristics. As a result, there is concern that they wouldn’t be
able to genuinely recognize them in others. Not a good thing for hiring
or development.3. We don’t know what we don’t know. And we admit it. This is a fairly bold step. I don’t know all the answers, nor does my
client. We’re willing to go with what we believe is a well thought-out
methodology and learn some things along the way.One more really important note:Have a look at Business Orientation. This is one of my
favorite and most satisfying realizations of the past 30 years. Companies naturally hire top-notch researchers, technology pros, and
other specialists for their expertise. Then the company is disappointed
when these folks don’t pay attention to the P&L statement and other
related business factors. So, my urging is this: Start looking for people who  begin
their day with a business mentality and use their specialty to
contribute to results. That is, find  people who have the self-image of a
business person who does great research, or who “practices” I.T. It’s a
different way to look at this whole talent thing– give it a try. You
will discover that by changing your thinking you’ll change how
you begin to filter candidates and “promotables” more accurately.What are you doing in your organization?
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Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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Talent For The Long Run

If You Are

In Business For the Long run. . .

. . .then you need the kind of people who will:

1. Take you there

2. Keep you there

Do you know who those “kinds” of people are?

I’m in the midst of working with a company who wants to genuinely

hire and develop talent for the future. So I put together an activity

(doesn’t take long with the right cross-section of people) to pinpoint

the talents needed by everyone in order to take this company where it

wants to go.

Below is a graphic that shows the results of the session. These are

now being used as an over-arching set of characteristics by which to

hire and identify current talent.

I’ll explain a little more following the graphic.

One important note:

When we talk about “ability” in the examples, we are talking about an

observable, consistent tendency to demonstrate the related

behavior in a variety of situations. We are focused on people who will

demonstrate these talents regardless of role, job description or

business unit.

Have a look:

Core_talents_systemic001

The Benefits

1. A key group of people has to dig deep–mentally and

emotionally–to agree on these fundamental talents.

2. We are talking about a systemic issue here. Instead of talking

philosophically about building a culture, a critical mass of people with

these talents will create and sustain it.

3.These are tied directly to the long-term strategy.

4. We can assess/identify who exhibits or possesses these, even if

they haven’t yet had the opportunity to display them in hugely

noticeable ways. That is, the organization is committed to uncovering

what may not have been obvious in the way it operated in the past. They

are not willing to toss people by the wayside without a real good look

at what they are all about.

What Will Be Tough

1. Have you thought about the biases that people build toward others

after a period of time working together? (The expression “Familiarity

breeds contempt” comes to mind). So we’re setting up a methodology that

won’t allow any one ticked-off manager or colleague to have enough

singular power to zap someone because of some historical, one-time

incident.

2. It’s not clear that some of the HR staff have many of these

characteristics. As a result, there is concern that they wouldn’t be

able to genuinely recognize them in others. Not a good thing for hiring

or development.

3. We don’t know what we don’t know. And we admit it.

This is a fairly bold step. I don’t know all the answers, nor does my

client. We’re willing to go with what we believe is a well thought-out

methodology and learn some things along the way.

One more really important note:

Have a look at Business Orientation. This is one of my

favorite and most satisfying realizations of the past 30 years.

Companies naturally hire top-notch researchers, technology pros, and

other specialists for their expertise. Then the company is disappointed

when these folks don’t pay attention to the P&L statement and other

related business factors.

So, my urging is this: Start looking for people who  begin

their day with a business mentality and use their specialty to

contribute to results. That is, find  people who have the self-image of a

business person who does great research, or who “practices” I.T. It’s a

different way to look at this whole talent thing– give it a try. You

will discover that by changing your thinking you’ll change how

you begin to filter candidates and “promotables” more accurately.

What are you doing in your organization?


Link to original post

Avatar

Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

Uncategorized

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