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Should You Hide a Disability?

Dear Deb:

My brother has suffered with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) following his return from Egypt. He was on an international charity mission for impoverished children.   He witnessed the uprising, including violent deaths and other horrible things.  It has taken many months, but he is on the road to recovery to a point where he can return to work.   He is ashamed of his disability and wanted to avoid the entire situation on his resume and in the interviews that he hopes will be in his future.  What’s the best way to handle?  I think he should include it and that most people would understand. If they don’t, who needs them!

I appreciate your advice. 

Mark W.

Dear Mark:

Please thank your brother for his service.  It takes a special person to do a job like that.  I am sure that he touched the lives of many young people.  I am sorry for the tragedy and how it impacted him. 

Your instincts are correct.  This is something that he can’t hide.  It will be revealed eventually that he has not worked for the period of time since the incident.  Just based on the information that you shared, I would recommend that he include the work in Egypt on his resume.  International experience and leadership experience is valuable.  He probably has numerous skills gained during that experience that he can showcase on his resume.

Handling the disability is different.   That does not (and should not) be shown on the resume.  Instead, he can state that he was present during the uprising and subsequently took a hiatus.  Please ask your brother to contact me and I would be happy to gather more details so I can give him more specific advice.

Regards,

Deb

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Dear Deb:

My brother has suffered with PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) following his return from Egypt. He was on an international charity mission for impoverished children.   He witnessed the uprising, including violent deaths and other horrible things.  It has taken many months, but he is on the road to recovery to a point where he can return to work.   He is ashamed of his disability and wanted to avoid the entire situation on his resume and in the interviews that he hopes will be in his future.  What’s the best way to handle?  I think he should include it and that most people would understand. If they don’t, who needs them!

I appreciate your advice. 

Mark W.

Dear Mark:

Please thank your brother for his service.  It takes a special person to do a job like that.  I am sure that he touched the lives of many young people.  I am sorry for the tragedy and how it impacted him. 

Your instincts are correct.  This is something that he can’t hide.  It will be revealed eventually that he has not worked for the period of time since the incident.  Just based on the information that you shared, I would recommend that he include the work in Egypt on his resume.  International experience and leadership experience is valuable.  He probably has numerous skills gained during that experience that he can showcase on his resume.

Handling the disability is different.   That does not (and should not) be shown on the resume.  Instead, he can state that he was present during the uprising and subsequently took a hiatus.  Please ask your brother to contact me and I would be happy to gather more details so I can give him more specific advice.

Regards,

Deb

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