Resume Help: Stick to the Facts

Today’s candidate, Harold, presented a five-page, long-winded resume that was so full of fluff that one could hardly discern the value he offers.  The resume is loaded with errors and language that makes little sense.  Suppose we remove all the errors and then edit that language so that one could read the document with greater ease.  The next issue would be the content.

Harold has used the first page and a half of his resume to list five competencies and characteristics:  project management, motivation, leadership, communication, and product development.  For the most part, he gives a definition and why such skills are important. He does not even both to claim proficiency of those skills. We only showed two of these five items in this snippet.  This information adds no value what-so-ever to Harold’s resume. In fact, it causes one to think that Harold is clueless.

The lesson here is to stick to the pertinent facts.  The pertinent facts are aspects of the candidate’s education and career history that demonstrate the value of the candidate.  Examples to mention from one’s career history include:  scope of responsibility for recent jobs, major accomplishments from recent jobs, industry certifications, honors, awards, publications, and noteworthy presentations.  All else matters very little and can be a distraction when a hiring employer is trying to determine if the candidate is viable.

The bottom line is: Stick to the facts and leave the fluff for your pillow!

If you want to read more about résumé writing, check out these blog entries.

Resume Help:  Don’t Bury the Lead

Resume Help:  Accountant Lacking Details and Order

Resume Help:  More to the Story

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Resume Help: Stick to the Facts

Today’s candidate, Harold, presented a five-page, long-winded resume that was so full of fluff that one could hardly discern the value he offers.  The resume is loaded with errors and language that makes little sense.  Suppose we remove all the errors and then edit that language so that one could read the document with greater ease.  The next issue would be the content.

Harold has used the first page and a half of his resume to list five competencies and characteristics:  project management, motivation, leadership, communication, and product development.  For the most part, he gives a definition and why such skills are important. He does not even both to claim proficiency of those skills. We only showed two of these five items in this snippet.  This information adds no value what-so-ever to Harold’s resume. In fact, it causes one to think that Harold is clueless.

The lesson here is to stick to the pertinent facts.  The pertinent facts are aspects of the candidate’s education and career history that demonstrate the value of the candidate.  Examples to mention from one’s career history include:  scope of responsibility for recent jobs, major accomplishments from recent jobs, industry certifications, honors, awards, publications, and noteworthy presentations.  All else matters very little and can be a distraction when a hiring employer is trying to determine if the candidate is viable.

The bottom line is: Stick to the facts and leave the fluff for your pillow!

If you want to read more about résumé writing, check out these blog entries.

Resume Help:  Don’t Bury the Lead

Resume Help:  Accountant Lacking Details and Order

Resume Help:  More to the Story

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