Men and Achievement: More Romantic Than Engaged?

Bizrelations
Eureka, I’ve found it!

Business-related research that finally allows the kind of cheesy headline to attract readers from all genres while losing my core group in the process.

Please say you’ll still love me in the morning.

The headline in Science Daily reads:

Men Choose Romance Over Success

Men may be more willing than women to sacrifice achievement goals for a
romantic relationship.

This according to a new study by Catherine Mosher of
Duke Medical Center and Sharon Danoff-Burg from the University of
Albany.

The findings challenge preconceptions that women are more
likely to prioritize people and relationships while men are more
focused on themselves and their achievements.

Both groups wanted achievement and relational intimacy. But the men
were more likely to give romance the priority if faced with a choice
between a relationship and career, education, and travel.

Hmm. Here’s a deep “guy” life question:

Shall I spend the day working my tail off, getting up early for a lecture, and standing in line at the airport?

OR,

Do I spend the day making out with my girlfriend? (Please note my totally unapologetic and obviously un-evolved male bias toward a definition of romance and relationship).

The men and women in the study were college students who, as we
know, are deeply committed to distinguishing the difference between
romance, relationships, and achievement.

Interestingly, the researchers posit that the women in the study may be more strongly committed to career achievement and less likely to sacrifice it for a relationship.

What If It Proves to be True?

Would that change the dynamic when it comes to hiring, promotion,
and making assumptions about employee engagement based on demographics?

For a fascinating look at a historical example of the relationship between romance and success, do read “Would You Rather Be Right or Romantic?”  
________________________________________________

This
is a post I wrote a couple of years ago, but it never seems to go out
of style:-)

Link to original post

Avatar

Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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Men and Achievement: More Romantic Than Engaged?

Bizrelations
Eureka, I’ve found it!

Business-related research that finally allows the kind of cheesy headline to attract readers from all genres while losing my core group in the process.

Please say you’ll still love me in the morning.

The headline in Science Daily reads:

Men Choose Romance Over Success

Men may be more willing than women to sacrifice achievement goals for a
romantic relationship.

This according to a new study by Catherine Mosher of
Duke Medical Center and Sharon Danoff-Burg from the University of
Albany.

The findings challenge preconceptions that women are more
likely to prioritize people and relationships while men are more
focused on themselves and their achievements.

Both groups wanted achievement and relational intimacy. But the men
were more likely to give romance the priority if faced with a choice
between a relationship and career, education, and travel.

Hmm. Here’s a deep “guy” life question:

Shall I spend the day working my tail off, getting up early for a lecture, and standing in line at the airport?

OR,

Do I spend the day making out with my girlfriend? (Please note my totally unapologetic and obviously un-evolved male bias toward a definition of romance and relationship).

The men and women in the study were college students who, as we
know, are deeply committed to distinguishing the difference between
romance, relationships, and achievement.

Interestingly, the researchers posit that the women in the study may be more strongly committed to career achievement and less likely to sacrifice it for a relationship.

What If It Proves to be True?

Would that change the dynamic when it comes to hiring, promotion,
and making assumptions about employee engagement based on demographics?

For a fascinating look at a historical example of the relationship between romance and success, do read “Would You Rather Be Right or Romantic?”  
________________________________________________

This
is a post I wrote a couple of years ago, but it never seems to go out
of style:-) I’ll be heading back Wednesday night from the engagement at
Corporate University Week in Florida with new information about what’s
happening with learning in organizations.

Link to original post

Avatar

Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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