Leadership Books & Courage

One of the best leadership books I read last year was Dare to Lead by Brené Brown.

As I work with leaders through the EOS® process and as part of the LeaderWork program, I am constantly in situations where I see people display courage and speak/hear truth, and where not enough courage is there – yet. The irony is, I am like my clients – sometimes I have it and sometimes I don’t.

This book will help you rethink courage and vulnerability in such a way that, as adults, we can have more impact and let go of some of the things that are taking up too much of our brain/thought space. In EOS we call it headtrash, and the author refers to it often as the stories we tell ourselves.

This book review is simple: here are a dozen quotes I love. If you want more, there is a link at the end to the note I wrote myself to help me return to the forty-four pages that contain the nuggets of wisdom I will come back to often this year.

If you want a free copy, here is a simple way to potentially earn it. Share this on LinkedIn, Twitter, or Facebook in the next week and tag me. From those names, I will draw 5 and send you a free copy!

Make 2020 about Courage, Vulnerability, and leading in your life!
~ Scott

P.S. Here is a link if you want to buy a copy right now.

My Favorite Quotes

All from Brené Brown:

  • Calm: Creating perspective and mindfulness while managing emotional reactivity. 
  • We asked a thousand leaders to list marble-earning behaviors – what do your team members do that earns your trust? The most common answer: ask for help. 
  • In the absence of data, we will always make up stories. 
  • The 3 most dangerous stories we make up are the narratives that diminish our lovability, divinity, and creativity.
  • Vulnerability is not winning or losing. It’s having the courage to show up when you can’t control the outcome. 
  • Just remember, we can’t do our jobs when we own other people’s emotions or take responsibility for them as a way to control the related behaviors for one simple reason: other people’s emotions are not our jobs. We can’t both serve people and try to control their feelings.
  • The Vulnerability Armory: As children we found ways to protect ourselves from vulnerability, from being hurt, diminished, and disappointed. We put on armor; we used our thoughts, emotions, and behaviors as weapons; and we learned how to make ourselves scarce, even to disappear. Now as adults we realize that to live with courage, purpose, and connection – to be the person we long to be – we must again be vulnerable. We must take off the armor, put down the weapons, show up, and let ourselves be seen. 
  • Perfectionism is not self-improvement. Perfectionism is, at its core, about trying to earn approval. 
  • Perfectionism is not the key to success. In fact, research shows that perfectionism hampers Achievement. 
  • Perfectionism is not the same thing as striving for excellence. Perfectionism is not about healthy achievement and growth. Perfectionism is a defensive move.
  • Confabulation: A lie told honestly.

And one from Joseph Campbell (for Star Wars fans, he consulted with George Lucas on the films):

  • The cave you fear to enter holds the treasure you seek. ~ Do you remember the scene that uses this?

Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash

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I started the trU Group to help organizations and leaders in transition realize growth and excellence. My expertise lies in creating strategy, developing leaders, and then building and equipping both leaders and leadership teams to effectively manage growth. I partner with small- and medium-sized businesses that desire healthy growth and are challenged with having the time for development. I believe that in transitions there are tremendous opportunities for growth, and tremendous risks for both individuals and organizations; I help organizations and leaders seize those opportunities while avoiding some of the risks becoming reality. I bring a balance of academic knowledge, experience of working with hundreds of leaders, and the personal experience of leading through key business transition situations, with a passion for people-centered leadership.

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