Kindergarten, Recruitment, and Poker-What needs to change?

This post is part of the wonderful Carnival of HR, hosted this go-around by Mike VanDervort. This Carnival is extra special as the host and contributors are using it to highlight some of their favorite charities. The one I chose is the NY Public Library.

If you want to hear my geeky serenade about the NYPL, then press the ‘Play’ button. And then go check out the other great Carnival blog posts.

Have a wonderful holiday!



My son’s currently in Pre-K and my daughter’s in grade school. Her day starts earlier so we take them both to her school first. While my daughter goes off to hang-out with her friends and get ready for class, my son follows his daily routine. He heads downstairs and goes to the Kindergarten classroom. He goes around and visits the animals, looks at the kids artwork on the walls, and reads the books on the shelf. He also talks to the teacher as she gets ready for her class. Some days he’s also had the opportunity to join in with the others. He’s seen the routines and understands (in his Pre-K way) what a typical day in Kindergarten looks like. Everyone enjoys it; the beauty of it is that next year he’ll be in that very class as a student. All parties involved are happy and his transition should be smooth.

Why isn’t recruiting more like this?

Recruiting in my experience is still a rigid and secretive process. To use a poker metaphor, both parties are holding their cards close at all times. No one wants to reveal too much too soon or else they’ll lose the advantage (as well as the winnings). Yet recruiters spend a large portion of their time highlighting the organization. “This is why YOU want to work here!” Candidates, of course, are playing a similar game. Resume’s and other professional profiles are carefully crafted. Candidate’s emphasize what they have to offer and downplay what they perceive as deficits. “Here’s why Iwant to work here!”

Meanwhile, these scenarios are taking place in settings that aren’t an accurate reflection of the candidate’s potential future workplace. A lot of the initial legwork takes place electronically via Linkedin, e-mails, and phone screens, for example. Further interviews may take place where, while located in the potential workplace, is set-up apart from it (e.g., an office). Recruiting is set-up so that both parties may get a peek into, but not the full scope of, what they have to offer each other.

And then we wonder why so many new hires leave shortly after they arrive. We did not do a good enough job to prepare them for the complete work experience. I work in retail and can tell you that sitting in a room with a candidate explaining the ebb and flow of the sales floor is not the same as having them stand there prior to the interview and experience it for themselves. It helps us to establish their commitment level and reduce misunderstandings about the nature of the work we do.

So my question to you is this-what can be done to open up the recruitment so that it’s more open, accurate i terms of the full work experience, and fun, for that matter?

My son figured it out, so why can’t we?

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Kindergarten, Recruitment, and Poker-What needs to change?

This post is part of the wonderful Carnival of HR, hosted this go-around by Mike VanDervort. This Carnival is extra special as the host and contributors are using it to highlight some of their favorite charities. The one I chose is the NY Public Library.

If you want to hear my geeky serenade about the NYPL, then press the ‘Play’ button. And then go check out the other great Carnival blog posts.

Have a wonderful holiday!



My son’s currently in Pre-K and my daughter’s in grade school. Her day starts earlier so we take them both to her school first. While my daughter goes off to hang-out with her friends and get ready for class, my son follows his daily routine. He heads downstairs and goes to the Kindergarten classroom. He goes around and visits the animals, looks at the kids artwork on the walls, and reads the books on the shelf. He also talks to the teacher as she gets ready for her class. Some days he’s also had the opportunity to join in with the others. He’s seen the routines and understands (in his Pre-K way) what a typical day in Kindergarten looks like. Everyone enjoys it; the beauty of it is that next year he’ll be in that very class as a student. All parties involved are happy and his transition should be smooth.

Why isn’t recruiting more like this?

Recruiting in my experience is still a rigid and secretive process. To use a poker metaphor, both parties are holding their cards close at all times. No one wants to reveal too much too soon or else they’ll lose the advantage (as well as the winnings). Yet recruiters spend a large portion of their time highlighting the organization. “This is why YOU want to work here!” Candidates, of course, are playing a similar game. Resume’s and other professional profiles are carefully crafted. Candidate’s emphasize what they have to offer and downplay what they perceive as deficits. “Here’s why Iwant to work here!”

Meanwhile, these scenarios are taking place in settings that aren’t an accurate reflection of the candidate’s potential future workplace. A lot of the initial legwork takes place electronically via Linkedin, e-mails, and phone screens, for example. Further interviews may take place where, while located in the potential workplace, is set-up apart from it (e.g., an office). Recruiting is set-up so that both parties may get a peek into, but not the full scope of, what they have to offer each other.

And then we wonder why so many new hires leave shortly after they arrive. We did not do a good enough job to prepare them for the complete work experience. I work in retail and can tell you that sitting in a room with a candidate explaining the ebb and flow of the sales floor is not the same as having them stand there prior to the interview and experience it for themselves. It helps us to establish their commitment level and reduce misunderstandings about the nature of the work we do.

So my question to you is this-what can be done to open up the recruitment so that it’s more open, accurate i terms of the full work experience, and fun, for that matter?

My son figured it out, so why can’t we?

Link to original post

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Uncategorized

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