How To Get Your Good Ideas Heard

After spending the last week or more in meetings, I heard a lot of ideas. Most of them were pretty good. But they didn’t all get the same amount of air time.Why not? Adapt Your Thoughts and IdeasThe senior people in each meeting wanted to hear “new stuff.” They also have “bigger picture” responsibilities, more demands on their time, and a long-term view of their respective companies. That makes their mental filters subject to some very specific criteria. As I watched the thumbs up/(silent) thumbs down process, I thought: “What am I learning from this that could be universally transferable?”Here are four questionsto ask yourself before offering the next big idea:1. Will this idea make other people successful?Really. If it’s not going to do that, you’ve got what might be a good idea for you or you and your immediate work group.2. Is my presentation as brief as possible because I have thoroughly edited my thoughts?Figure out what is important to those in the room and what isn’t. Everything isn’t important to them. And if they do start asking questions it means they care enough to engage you. That’s an indicator of interest, even if the questions sound critical They are evaluating. And they aren’t worried about the time because you’ve given them something worthwhile to ponder.3. Do I have objective criteria for success?Even if your idea is a creative one, take time to link it to something that can be measured. If not, it will appear fuzzy to many. The more concrete you can be, the clearer the picture you are able to paint.4. How do I feel about the idea?Yeah, I know it’s yours. But make sure that you feel confident about it as well as committing to the work that would ensue. Ideas are sold on confidence and emotion supported up by reasonable facts. Pay attention to your gut.
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Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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How To Get Your Good Ideas Heard

After spending the last week or more in meetings, I heard a lot of ideas. Most of them were pretty good. But they didn’t all get the same amount of air time.

Why not?

 Adapt Your Thoughts and Ideas

The senior people in each meeting wanted to hear “new stuff.” They also have “bigger picture” responsibilities, more demands on their time, and a long-term view of their respective companies. That makes their mental filters subject to some very specific criteria.

As I watched the thumbs up/(silent) thumbs down process, I thought: “What am I learning from this that could be universally transferable?”

Here are four questions to ask yourself before offering the next big idea:Ideas

1. Will this idea make other people successful?

Really. If it’s not going to do that, you’ve got what might be a good idea for you or you and your immediate work group.

2. Is my presentation as brief as possible because I have thoroughly edited my thoughts?

Figure out what is important to those in the room and what isn’t. Everything isn’t important to them. And if they do start asking questions it means they care enough to engage you. That’s an indicator of interest, even if the questions sound critical They are evaluating. And they aren’t worried about the time because you’ve given them something worthwhile to ponder.

3. Do I have objective criteria for success?

Even if your idea is a creative one, take time to link it to something that can be measured. If not, it will appear fuzzy to many. The more concrete you can be, the clearer the picture you are able to paint.

4. How do I feel about the idea?

Yeah, I know it’s yours. But make sure that you feel confident about it as well as committing to the work that would ensue. Ideas are sold on confidence and emotion supported up by reasonable facts. Pay attention to your gut.


Link to original post

Avatar

Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

Uncategorized

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