How Do You Define “Talent?”

We do a lot of executive assessment and coaching. As a result, I see people who are at mid-life and realizing that their inherent talents and interests don’t match what they are doing. Most would like to stay with their current employer but need some helping getting a good hearing when it comes to using their giftedness elsewhere in the organization.According to my friend,Dr. Ellen Weber:”It’s common knowledge that people use far less of their talent than they possess. It’s also increasingly recognized that wasted, unused, or hidden talents can literally shrink a person’s brain. But how can a person develop more talent given the complexity of the brain to recognize such hidden or unused talent, and the rigidity of some workplaces to value unique capabilities of its workers?”  Here Is The QuestionHow is your company addressing “talent management?”I will confess that I sometimes struggle with what I see as an emphasis on a shopping list of competencies to define talent. It sounds rational and understandable to look at jobs, define behavioral competencies, and then try to ascertain who has those competencies. How it sometimes gets played out:1. Frequently there are numerous–I’ve seen as many as thirty –competencies attached to a position. If God decided to offer up only ten commandments to successfully live a lifetime, thirty seems a bit much for a supply chain manager. 2. Assessment centers, 360 feedback, and other tools are used to find out who has what competencies and to what degree. That’s fine and they can be very accurate. Just tell me when you find someone who is competent at thirty of anything. 3. The actual ideas of genuine “talent” and related passion and excitement often don’t show up on the radar screen in discussions. It takes relationships, discernment, and deep conversation to get at the heart of a person’s real talents and how best to use them organizationally. What’s going on in your company?
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Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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How Do You Define “Talent?”

We do a lot of executive assessment and coaching. 

As a result, I see people who are at mid-life and realizing that their inherent talents and interests don’t match what they are doing. Most would like to stay with their current employer but need some helping getting a good hearing when it comes to using their giftedness elsewhere in the organization.

According to my friend, Dr. Ellen Weber:

“It’s common knowledge that people use far less of their talent than they possess. It’s also increasingly recognized that wasted, unused, or hidden talents can literally shrink a person’s brain. But how can a person develop more talent given the complexity of the brain to recognize such hidden or unused talent, and the rigidity of some workplaces to value unique capabilities of its workers?”


Catpiano  
Here Is The Question

How is your company addressing “talent management?”

I will confess that I sometimes struggle with what I see as an emphasis on a shopping list of competencies to define talent. It sounds rational and understandable to look at jobs, define behavioral competencies, and then try to ascertain who has those competencies. 

How it sometimes gets played out:

1. Frequently there are numerous–I’ve seen as many as thirty –competencies attached to a position. If God decided to offer up only ten commandments to successfully live a lifetime, thirty seems a bit much for a supply chain manager. 

2. Assessment centers, 360 feedback, and other tools are used to find out who has what competencies and to what degree. That’s fine and they can be very accurate. Just tell me when you find someone who is competent at thirty of anything. 

3. The actual ideas of genuine “talent” and related passion and excitement often don’t show up on the radar screen in discussions. It takes relationships, discernment, and deep conversation to get at the heart of a person’s real talents and how best to use them organizationally. 

What’s going on in your company?




Link to original post

Steve has designed and delivered leadership and communication programs for some of the world's largest organizations, and has more than 30 years in training, development, and high-level executive coaching. His Roesler Group has created and delivered leadership and talent development internationally for corporations such as Pfizer, Minerals Technologies, Johnson & Johnson, NordCarb Oy Ab, and Specialty Minerals--Europe. Steve is currently involved in the latest update of his Presenting With Impact program, a cross-cultural presentations workshop that has been delivered on five continents to more than 1,000 participants representing nearly 60 nationalities.

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