Get Started: Five blog post ideas to market your small business

Image credit: techiemania.com

When you decide to dive into blogging, the plain white screen in front of you can be a bit intimidating.

What should I say? How do I start? Do people really want to read about that?

Good question. A good blog will look different after six months. It’s a development process. You’re in infancy now, you’ll go through a gawky teen period with every conceivable social bookmarking icon and changing themes as often as your retainer color, and evolve into a functioning adult.

That said, here are a few good first posts to help you cut your teeth in the blogosphere if you’re marketing your business.

  • Who you are: Why should we listen to you? What is your education and expertise? What are your credentials that would make us sit up and take notice when you offer commentary on a particular topic? From both a human and professional angle, introduce yourself to your readers and explain why we should believe what you post and act on it.
  • What your company is: Now that we know who you are, what does your company do? You’re more than a cog in the wheel, even when you’re the owner, so explain why you founded the company, what your mission is, what problem it is that you’re solving.
  • Your successes: When it comes to your business, what are you most proud of? What success stories do you have to offer? What do clients say about you? If you have a case study that shows how you’ve helped a client, now’s the time to post it.
  • Your client base: Of the first five posts, this might be the most important. Explain who your typical clients are – with some detail, if possible. This allows a reader (who might be a potential client) to see themselves in a possible business relationship with you. Who hires you? Why? What can you do for them? Who gets the most out of your services? From your perspective this is also the time to narrow your target market – if you’re trying to appeal to a specific type of client, spell it out for them. Make it clear that you are uniquely suited to aid them and cater to their needs specifically.
  • Why you’re the best for me for this job: What sets you apart from your competition? Why should I hire you instead of the other guys? What experience do you have that makes you a better fit for my needs? This post should be a no holds barred marketing post that establishes why you are the expert in this area, why your service model is superior. In short, make it clear to your readers why you are the person to consult for the services or products provided.

Your first five posts should each be:

  • Between 250 and 600 words in length – make it easy for readers to learn about you without a huge time commitment initially. Pages with too little unique content are less likely to get indexed and ranked in Google, so give those robots a little something to nibble on.
  • Written in a conversational tone to engage the reader.
  • Tagged and categorized to make them easier to find – now and in the future – on your site.

Jump in a get your feet wet. Pretty soon, that white page looks inviting. And happy blogging!

Share this link:RSS email Digg del.icio.us Facebook Twitter Posterous Ping.fm LinkedIn PDF Print

Related posts:

  1. Introducing Social Media 1-2-3 – a new series of blog posts for social media beginners
  2. Five tips for a successful Facebook fan page
  3. Visit Pixel/Point Press at the Modiin Business Fair on Friday



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Get Started: Five blog post ideas to market your small business

Image credit: techiemania.com

When you decide to dive into blogging, the plain white screen in front of you can be a bit intimidating.

What should I say? How do I start? Do people really want to read about that?

Good question. A good blog will look different after six months. It’s a development process. You’re in infancy now, you’ll go through a gawky teen period with every conceivable social bookmarking icon and changing themes as often as your retainer color, and evolve into a functioning adult.

That said, here are a few good first posts to help you cut your teeth in the blogosphere if you’re marketing your business.

  • Who you are: Why should we listen to you? What is your education and expertise? What are your credentials that would make us sit up and take notice when you offer commentary on a particular topic? From both a human and professional angle, introduce yourself to your readers and explain why we should believe what you post and act on it.
  • What your company is: Now that we know who you are, what does your company do? You’re more than a cog in the wheel, even when you’re the owner, so explain why you founded the company, what your mission is, what problem it is that you’re solving.
  • Your successes: When it comes to your business, what are you most proud of? What success stories do you have to offer? What do clients say about you? If you have a case study that shows how you’ve helped a client, now’s the time to post it.
  • Your client base: Of the first five posts, this might be the most important. Explain who your typical clients are – with some detail, if possible. This allows a reader (who might be a potential client) to see themselves in a possible business relationship with you. Who hires you? Why? What can you do for them? Who gets the most out of your services? From your perspective this is also the time to narrow your target market – if you’re trying to appeal to a specific type of client, spell it out for them. Make it clear that you are uniquely suited to aid them and cater to their needs specifically.
  • Why you’re the best for me for this job: What sets you apart from your competition? Why should I hire you instead of the other guys? What experience do you have that makes you a better fit for my needs? This post should be a no holds barred marketing post that establishes why you are the expert in this area, why your service model is superior. In short, make it clear to your readers why you are the person to consult for the services or products provided.

Your first five posts should each be:

  • Between 250 and 600 words in length – make it easy for readers to learn about you without a huge time commitment initially. Pages with too little unique content are less likely to get indexed and ranked in Google, so give those robots a little something to nibble on.
  • Written in a conversational tone to engage the reader.
  • Tagged and categorized to make them easier to find – now and in the future – on your site.

Jump in a get your feet wet. Pretty soon, that white page looks inviting. And happy blogging!

Share this link:RSS email Digg del.icio.us Facebook Twitter Posterous Ping.fm LinkedIn PDF Print

Related posts:

  1. Introducing Social Media 1-2-3 – a new series of blog posts for social media beginners
  2. Five tips for a successful Facebook fan page
  3. Visit Pixel/Point Press at the Modiin Business Fair on Friday



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Get Started: Five blog post ideas to market your small business

Image credit: techiemania.com

When you decide to dive into blogging, the plain white screen in front of you can be a bit intimidating.

What should I say? How do I start? Do people really want to read about that?

Good question. A good blog will look different after six months. It’s a development process. You’re in infancy now, you’ll go through a gawky teen period with every conceivable social bookmarking icon and changing themes as often as your retainer color, and evolve into a functioning adult.

That said, here are a few good first posts to help you cut your teeth in the blogosphere if you’re marketing your business.

  • Who you are: Why should we listen to you? What is your education and expertise? What are your credentials that would make us sit up and take notice when you offer commentary on a particular topic? From both a human and professional angle, introduce yourself to your readers and explain why we should believe what you post and act on it.
  • What your company is: Now that we know who you are, what does your company do? You’re more than a cog in the wheel, even when you’re the owner, so explain why you founded the company, what your mission is, what problem it is that you’re solving.
  • Your successes: When it comes to your business, what are you most proud of? What success stories do you have to offer? What do clients say about you? If you have a case study that shows how you’ve helped a client, now’s the time to post it.
  • Your client base: Of the first five posts, this might be the most important. Explain who your typical clients are – with some detail, if possible. This allows a reader (who might be a potential client) to see themselves in a possible business relationship with you. Who hires you? Why? What can you do for them? Who gets the most out of your services? From your perspective this is also the time to narrow your target market – if you’re trying to appeal to a specific type of client, spell it out for them. Make it clear that you are uniquely suited to aid them and cater to their needs specifically.
  • Why you’re the best for me for this job: What sets you apart from your competition? Why should I hire you instead of the other guys? What experience do you have that makes you a better fit for my needs? This post should be a no holds barred marketing post that establishes why you are the expert in this area, why your service model is superior. In short, make it clear to your readers why you are the person to consult for the services or products provided.

Your first five posts should each be:

  • Between 250 and 600 words in length – make it easy for readers to learn about you without a huge time commitment initially. Pages with too little unique content are less likely to get indexed and ranked in Google, so give those robots a little something to nibble on.
  • Written in a conversational tone to engage the reader.
  • Tagged and categorized to make them easier to find – now and in the future – on your site.

Jump in a get your feet wet. Pretty soon, that white page looks inviting. And happy blogging!

Share this link:RSS email Digg del.icio.us Facebook Twitter Posterous Ping.fm LinkedIn PDF Print

Related posts:

  1. Introducing Social Media 1-2-3 – a new series of blog posts for social media beginners
  2. Five tips for a successful Facebook fan page
  3. Visit Pixel/Point Press at the Modiin Business Fair on Friday



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