Ducks In A Row: Cultural Fit

Ducks In A Row: Cultural Fit

Post from: MAPpingCompanySuccess

There is much talk about the need for “cultural fit” when hiring and rightly so, since being in the wrong culture is equivalent to a fish out of water.

But does fitting require total acceptance? Does it mean agreeing 100% with every value and the way each is implemented?

It’s not nitpicking; bad hires are only one outcome of a bad fit between candidates and corporate culture; bad cultural fits are also the culprit in most screwed up M&A.

Actually, there are many similarities between hiring one person and acquiring/merging two companies—no matter how complementary the skills, technology and experience, cultural incompatibility typically leads to disaster.

While culture may not seem obvious when acquiring or hiring, due diligence and good interviewing is eminently capable of identifying and exploring it.

The problem is that managers often ignore cultural differences, because they believe they that their culture is ‘right’ and those joining will change—much like the people who marry “in spite of [x],” believing that s/he will change because s/he loves me.

Consider Amazon and Zappos vs. Microsoft and Skype and then think about the candidates you “hired anyway.”

The problem is often not a matter of right or wrong, but of different—the things that float your boat don’t float mine or, worse, sink it.

And 98% of the time you should have seen it coming.

Fickr image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zedbee/103147140/

Link to original post

Leave a Reply

Ducks in a Row: Cultural Fit

Post from: MAPpingCompanySuccess

Ducks in a Row: Cultural Fit

Not every soil can bear all things.

–Virgil

ducks_in_a_rowVirgil’s wise words have deep meaning when it comes to hiring.

Typically, managers interview for skills and experience that are similar to what the person will be doing in their new job.

Yet none of that information really predicts success.

If the culture of past company and the style of the candidate’s direct manager aren’t synergistic at the new company or with that particular hiring manager success may be ephemeral.

Like plants, different people need different growing conditions—soil, acidity, moisture, light—in order to thrive and grow.

It is the responsibility of the hiring manager, not HR or another manager, to determine if the soil is right for a particular candidate and, if not, can it be conditioned to support that person’s success.

Flickr image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/zedbee/103147140/

ShareThis

Link to original post

Uncategorized

Leave a Reply