Determining a Career Goal

Dear Deb:

I will earn my Bachelor of Business Administration in six months (with honors). I chose that degree because it would give me many options.  The truth is that I just don’t know what I want to do.  I’ve talked to advisors who told me to “Follow my bliss,” whatever that is.  I like and enjoy many things, but bliss is another thing.  How do I really know at the age of 21 what I want?  I know one thing; I don’t want to be living at my parent’s home.  If I don’t figure things out, that’s where I’ll be!

Do you have any suggestions for a soon-to-be college grad with potential, but without a definite goal?

Thanks,

Chris

Dear Chris:

To create a good strategy, we would need to talk personally and I may recommend some career assessment tools.  A career coach can help you understand the requirements of various occupations and the characteristics of those that are successful in particular occupations.  Coaches also can help you understand your unique values and characteristics. Beyond career coaches, there are many tests to help you get to know yourself more and that can help you determine the type of career that you might find fulfilling.  There is a great book called “Do What You Are.” I would recommend picking up a copy of the book at Barnes & Noble. 

I will also share a simple way to determine your personal motivation.   People are motivated by two things.  One is promotion, which means you are looking for a job that rapid advancement and high rewards.  This may be a career in which things move at a quick pace, such as technology.  It also includes jobs with higher risk and potential for bigger rewards, such as sales and entrepreneurial roles.  Another type of motivation is based on prevention or preservation.  If this is your motivation, you would be suited for a job with security. Rather than a sales, entrepreneurial, or leadership role, you may seek a role as an analyst or administrator.

This is just an overview to give you a sense of things you may want to consider.  If you would like to learn more about career coaching, contact me.  I’d be happy to discuss it with you. This is a big decision and your decision to approach it earnestly is wise.

Sincerely,

Deb

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Determining a Career Goal

Dear Deb:

I will earn my Bachelor of Business Administration in six months (with honors). I chose that degree because it would give me many options.  The truth is that I just don’t know what I want to do.  I’ve talked to advisors who told me to “Follow my bliss,” whatever that is.  I like and enjoy many things, but bliss is another thing.  How do I really know at the age of 21 what I want?  I know one thing; I don’t want to be living at my parent’s home.  If I don’t figure things out, that’s where I’ll be!

Do you have any suggestions for a soon-to-be college grad with potential, but without a definite goal?

Thanks,

Chris

Dear Chris:

To create a good strategy, we would need to talk personally and I may recommend some career assessment tools.  A career coach can help you understand the requirements of various occupations and the characteristics of those that are successful in particular occupations.  Coaches also can help you understand your unique values and characteristics. Beyond career coaches, there are many tests to help you get to know yourself more and that can help you determine the type of career that you might find fulfilling.  There is a great book called “Do What You Are.” I would recommend picking up a copy of the book at Barnes & Noble. 

I will also share a simple way to determine your personal motivation.   People are motivated by two things.  One is promotion, which means you are looking for a job that rapid advancement and high rewards.  This may be a career in which things move at a quick pace, such as technology.  It also includes jobs with higher risk and potential for bigger rewards, such as sales and entrepreneurial roles.  Another type of motivation is based on prevention or preservation.  If this is your motivation, you would be suited for a job with security. Rather than a sales, entrepreneurial, or leadership role, you may seek a role as an analyst or administrator.

This is just an overview to give you a sense of things you may want to consider.  If you would like to learn more about career coaching, contact me.  I’d be happy to discuss it with you. This is a big decision and your decision to approach it earnestly is wise.

Sincerely,

Deb

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