Check out the new book by one of our favorite authors Peter Psichogios

Leading from the Front Line: Learn How to Create Exceptional Customer Experiences.

Click here to learn more about Peter's new book!

5 for Friday: Employee Engagement Edition

5 for Friday: Employee Engagement EditionBest practices for building employee engagement are shifting as HR leaders continue to discover what keeps employees happy and invested in their work. This week’s’ 5 for Friday brings you articles with insight and information on what it really takes to get employees engaged and keep them that way.

  • The 5 New Rules of Employee Engagement. ERC: “Historically, employee engagement has been an employer initiative or an annual survey endeavor. It’s been mostly focused on implementing workplace programs, but not addressing systemic, cultural problems that hinder engagement. This traditional approach has had limited success. Nowadays, the more effective way to improve employee engagement is embedding it into the culture: assessing it on an ongoing basis via surveying, having senior leaders commit to it as a priority, cascading it throughout the organization, and sustaining it.”
  • Employee Engagement Starts in the Recruiting Process. Acacia HR Solutions: “First impressions are hard to overcome. Imagine an employee who went through a crappy interview process. They took the job because they were really interested in the opportunity – or worse – they just needed to work. Even if you do everything right from the start, you are starting behind. The employee already has a negative impression of the company that you have to overcome just to get to ground zero. Any negative occurrences just reinforce what happen to them in the recruiting process and employee engagement takes a few steps back again.”
  • Employee Bonding: How Work Benefits. BambooHR: “Sometimes employees feel strained interacting with one another inside the office. But when employees are taken outside the office and are surrounded by an informal setting—even trees and birds if you provide an outdoor setting—they can relax and enjoy each other’s company. Other times, employers provide a weekend retreat that includes dinners and seminars. Because employees are spending time together after hours and in different situations as a whole group, employees have more opportunities for bonding and relating to one another in finding common interests. It’s nice to get away from the ringing telephones and other office noises and really get to know each other.”
  • Want Engaged Employees? Tell Them Why. Talent Culture: “Engagement is forged with different tools — trust, loyalty, open communication, clearly-articulated goals and expectations, shared values and well-understood reward systems. It really isn’t about how the office is designed, or how many toys you offer as distractions. It’s about treating employees as humans who are worthy of respect. How can you expect an employee to “get it” if you don’t communicate a shared sense of mission, vision and goals? Tell people why you want them to work at your company, and why you think they’ll succeed. Then you can focus on how they can achieve those goals.”
  • Employee Engagement: Where Do We Begin? Kinesis: “Unfortunately, HR departments everywhere are implementing Band-Aid solutions like ‘employee engagement programs’ with canned presentations that fall short of adding true meaning to the people they are trying to reach. The truth of the matter – and what these Band-Aid solutions miss – is that people are engaged by a sense of community and personal growth. Your employees care about having meaning in their day and mastering new skills. In order to facilitate this type of motivation and have people in your organization who are truly engaged – you need to get intentional about changing your company’s culture.”


Link to original postOriginally published on MonsterThinking

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Employee engagement is essential when it comes to having productive and positive employees. This week’s 5 for Friday rounds up advice for HR professionals who are working to get their employees actively engaged in the company’s success.

  • 5 Ways You’re Alienating Your Employees (And How to Stop). Business News Daily: “When workers are disengaged, retention shouldn’t be a company’s only concern — productivity and customer service levels also suffer,” said OfficeTeam executive director Robert Hosking. “There are many factors that contribute to strong employee engagement — chief among them are the ability of staff to reach professional goals and understand how they contribute to the organization’s big-picture objectives.”
  • The Management Theory That Explains Why 70% of Workers Are ‘Disengaged’. Forbes: Only 21% of employees globally are “fully engaged” – committed to their organization’s success, and freely giving of their time, energy and ideas to help assure that success. I don’t have the data to support this, but I’d bet you anything that an extraordinarily high percentage of the 1 in 5 fully engaged employees are working for companies that focus on the customer; companies operating on the theory that business success comes from creating and offering great products or services that customers really want, in the ways they want them.”
  • Disengaged Employees? Do Something About It. Harvard Business Review: “Study after study shows that employee engagement, an index of bringing one’s best and full self to work, is not just an organizational nicety. It is a business imperative, linked to a number of performance outcomes, including profitability, customer satisfaction and turnover. A 2012 report on human capital from McKinsey added to the evidence, noting that organizations with top scores in employee motivation are about 60% more likely to be in the top quartile for overall business health.”
  • Retaining Your Number One Asset: Employees. Manufacturing Business Technology: “There is one absolute that applies to every company, independent of industry: You cannot expect to operate efficiently without dedicated and skilled employees. When looking at the manufacturing industry specifically, finding a highly skilled workforce has proven to be one of the greatest challenges. With such a limited amount of talent in the applicant pool, companies are left to compete for the best employees.”
  • What Your Company Can Learn From the Best. Gallup: “Only 30% of American employees are engaged in their jobs — a figure that hasn’t moved much in more than a decade. Given the proven links between employee engagement and financial outcomes, this low level of engagement is a drag on an already sluggish U.S. economy. Imagine the positive — even dramatic — impact on the country’s economic prospects if companies could double the number of their engaged employees.”


Link to original postOriginally published on MonsterThinking

0 Comments

Leave a reply

This week’s 5 for Friday rounds up five stories about the latest trends in employee engagement.

  • Social Tools Can Improve Employee Onboarding. HBR Blog Network: “Onboarding new employees is one of the most critical cross-functional processes in a company, involving a hiring manager, HR, IT, facilities, training, etc. The process is fraught with opportunities for failure.”
  • As Mobile Work Rises, 9-to-5 Jobs Decline. Information Week: “For knowledge workers, work means sitting at a desk, drinking coffee — and checking their mobile phone to see the latest status update on Facebook. It rarely involves physical labor. But that’s set to change. Due to mobile phones and broadband availability, the future of work may look less like sitting behind a desk, and more like my ride to work this morning,” writes Boonsri Dickinson.
  • Why Year-End Reviews Are A Big Fat Waste Of Time. FastCompany.com: “The standard-model performance review is an unhelpful barrage of built-up criticism. Instead, give feedback consistently so that your employees hear the good with the bad and make improvement a matter of routine.”
  • Is Culture Your Company’s Most Important Asset? SmartBlog on Leadership: “Most senior leaders put greater thought into their products and services than they do into their culture — yet culture drives everything that happens in an organization, for better or worse. Because of this fact, corporate culture may be your company’s most important asset. If you leave your corporate culture to chance, you may experience a culture that hurts or hinders employee performance and work passion,” writes S. Chris Edmonds.
  • 8 Ways to Be Innovative (Even if You’re Not). Inc.com: “Creativity isn’t a switch most of us can turn on at will, so the key to being innovative is to view a problem from a different perspective. Necessity is the mother of innovation, so creating a little artificial necessity automatically stimulates creativity.”


Link to original postOriginally published on MonsterThinking

0 Comments

Leave a reply

This week’s 5 for Friday rounds up five stories about the latest trends in employee engagement.

5. Are your meetings derailed by trivial matters? SmartBlog on Leadership: “There’s been plenty written about how to prevent wasting time at meetings, and yes, well planned agendas, process, meeting facilitation and participation skills are ALL very important,” writes Dan McCarthy. “However, my friend Alex tipped me off to something that I believe is vitally important for any leader to be aware of and could have a dramatic impact on how your team spends it’s time at meetings.”

4. The Unique Job Perks That Employees Love Forbes.com: “In a recent national survey, 95 percent of Americans consider a job’s perks and benefits before 
deciding to either stay in a position or accept an offer. Attracting top talent with just a higher salary is something of the past. Leaders overcome this hiring hurdle by creating and implementing unique perks to differentiate themselves from other companies. Here are 25 companies that are leading the way with creative perks that keep their employees more than happy.”

3. 4 Hiring Lessons From the Best Cities For Millennials Mashable: “Sometimes the personal touch is all you need to attract great candidates and show them your company cares,” writes Josh Tolan. “Make your application process more personal, so candidates don’t feel like they’re nothing more than a resume in an applicant tracking system. This could mean reaching out to talent on social media or even using online video to interview candidates earlier in the process. Whatever you do, make sure you treat the candidate like a person instead of just a resume on your desk.”

2. Dunkin’ Runs on Great Talent TalentMgt.com: “We need to sit down with all of our high-potential leaders and ask them: ‘What are [you] most excited about? What do [you] hope for 12 months from now?’ and outright ask them, ‘Is there anything that would cause you to leave us?’” says CHRO Ginger Gregory.

1. Inside Employee Motivation: Does Money Really Make a Difference? Entrepreneur.com: “Unless you’re extremely careful with how you use rewards, you get people who are just working for the money,” says Edward Deci, a human motivation psychologist at University of Rochester.


Link to original postOriginally published on MonsterThinking

0 Comments

Leave a reply

This week’s 5 for Friday rounds up five stories about the latest trends in employee engagement.

5. Small Gestures that Have a Big Impact on Your Workers. The Fast Track blog: “The way to be a great leader is not that hard. In fact, it’s often the smallest things that can make the biggest difference to workers and garner their loyalty and respect,” Anita Bruzzese writes.

4. Retention Surveys Reveal Gaps . Human Resource Executive: “There is this eroding loyalty of the worker, where one in three U.S. workers is seriously considering leaving their jobs,” says Loree Griffith, principal of Mercer’s talent rewards and communication in New York. “That goes hand in hand with their feelings that perhaps there are other opportunities opening up, particularly for those who have the right kinds of skills.”

3. Burnout Up Among Employees. USA Today: “A significant portion of the American workforce is burned out, and my concern is, that’s rising,” says Richard Chaifetz, CEO of ComPsych Corp., a Chicago-based provider of employee assistance programs to more than 17,000 organizations worldwide, covering more than 45 million employees.

2. Pay Employees What They Ask for. Here’s Why. Inc.com: “If you want employees who are passionate, productive–and do whatever it takes for your company–pay them what they ask for,” writes Ilya Pozin.

1. A CEO Takes on the War for Talent. Inc.com: “For fast-growing young companies such as NetSuite, hiring and managing workers are huge challenges. Rapidly expanding the workforce can strain a company’s entrepreneurial culture. So can hiring people who have great credentials and the wrong temperament. But if a company waits too long to find the right people, it risks missing business opportunities.”


Link to original postOriginally published on MonsterThinking

0 Comments

Leave a reply

©2016 Human Capital League Your business online - made simple!

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?