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Recruiting

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How did we lose our way?

On April 14 the Wall Street Journal ran an article about companies eliminating their HR departments. If you poll large enough population of corporate executives about the role of HR, a majority will tell you that HR is an obstacle to getting things done. A couple of weeks ago Robin Schooling, fellow HR blogger at HR Schoolhouse, stated she had asked a group of HR ladies how to increase employee engagement and their unanimous response was to hold a picnic. When we went to school many of us were taught to learn by the rote method.
So taking these facts into consideration where did HR lose its way? Since its inception, in many cases we were like the school student. We performed practices the same way every time.  If we needed to help someone with a benefit question we followed the same plan for action each time we answered that question. We are considered an obstacle to the organization because we do so. We are considered an obstacle because we portray ourselves as this silo that can do no wrong because that is what we do.
But times have changed. We need a new model for HR that is centered around being a vital part of the equation, We need a new HR model that is centered around ...
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How to recruit a more diverse talent pool

In addition to profits, innovation and corporate culture, companies are now starting to brag about their employee diversity, and rightly so. Hiring from a limited pool of candidates, whether determined by age, race, alma mater or another limiting factor, will in turn limit the ideas and creativity that comes into an organization. If your organization [...]

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3 areas of diversity employers should consider

Is your organization a diverse work environment? Take a quick look among the cubicles and in the lunchroom and you can usually get a pretty good idea.

3 areas of diversity employers should consider
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Talent Acquisition Fast Facts – Agents of Work-Life Imbalance

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Workplace stress is the most frequently cited reason U.S. employees want to leave their jobs, and this mental toll is often believed to be a result of long, grueling work days.

Yet, since 1950 the number of hours worked by U.S. employees have actually decreased from 1,900 per year to less than 1,790. Only 11.13% of U.S. employees work more than 50 hours per week (a decrease of 0.4% since 2004), while innovative technologies have dramatically increased productivity and efficiency.

So, we’re working less and have better tools and resources than ever before; why then, are so many organizations increasingly struggling to instill a healthy work-life balance?

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This week in HR

Reinventing HR, downsizing HR and big data analytics for HR have all been hot topics this week. Read on to learn more. HR downsizing seen as potentially dangerous trend Employee Benefits News: “According to Boro, the short-term benefits achieved from HR outsourcing can stifle business operation and management, as well as block real person connections. [...]

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Conflict Between Work Events and Family Events

Dear Deb:

I am required to attend an annual corporate golf trip.  All of the management team will be there, including many from home office and our top clients from the pharm side of business (my clients).   It’s basically a time to really connect on a deeper, more personal level with clients.  The only problem is that it’s the same weekend as my wife’s sister’s engagement party.  I already get a lot of “feedback” from my in-laws about the hours I work and the business entertaining that is part of my job.  It’s my career and I feel strongly that I need to choose the business trip. (Even though it is golf – it’s business)  How do I navigate this situation without the wrath of my in-laws?

Thanks,

Ben

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10 More Reasons You Should Exercise Regularly

Work Search Work Out - DumbbellYou know you should do it, and your job search is a great time to do it. Here's my original list of 10 Mighty Reasons to Work Out During Your Job Search. With those first reasons in mind- Regular exercise will also... 11. Settle at least part of your job search into a routine. Too much of a routine is boring and can lead to job search-prolonging inertia, but some routine is good so you don't feel like your search is ever spinning out of control. 12. One nice element of routines is that progress is easier to track. Even simple tracking of your exercise will build the habit of tracking your job search progress, which will ultimately lead to faster results.
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Resumes Lessons from a Can of Soup

Many food companies are savvy enough to know that most shoppers read food labels, despite being short on time. A label with eye-catching key statistics can give that product an edge over another product, especially if that product touts qualities such as low sugar, low calories, and zero trans fat.  Companies are wise to invest in smart labelling strategies.  

What does the calorie count on a can of soup have to do with your resume?   Resumes designed with the candidate’s top values visible at a glance are highly-effective.  Like grocery shoppers, recruiters and hiring managers are short on time.  Your resume is like that can of soup on the shelf with 100+ other cans.  Getting noticed means communicating your value quickly.   Your top values should be communicated at the top of your resume.

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Capture Your Meetings with Recaps

Imagine this scenario. You hold a meeting to plan the next 3 months of an important project. You hash out some great discussion, make decisions on important factors and divvy up tasks and responsibilities to various people on the team. One week later, your team is scrambling to meet a particular deadline for the project ...
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Resume Help: The Wrong Way to Handle a Career Break

Marlo is quite self-conscious about her eight-year career break.  Like many parents, especially mothers, she took a hiatus to raise her two children.  When her children were of school age, she decided to return to work.  She is so worried about showing that she was filling her time with worthy pursuits (other than raising her children).  That is what drove her to prominently feature a “Career Break” section at the very top of her resume.

This top section is in the high-value section of the resume.  Often a reader will quickly glance at the top of a resume. If they don’t like what they read,   they may eliminate that candidate. If they are intrigued, they will continue reading.